Twitter wording: How to write high conversion Twitter posts

How do you get your Twitter audience to react? Is it just a matter of Tweeting regularly, or can the wording of your Tweets mean a difference for the results you get. Check this out.

Written by Michael Leander

How to write effective Tweets and learn by testingTwitter is this beast that so many of us love to hate. Many argue that it is difficult to achieve Return on Marketing Investment
[ROMI] using Twitter for customer or lead acquisition purposes. Keeping your eye on the ball and testing can help increase ROMI for your Twitter activities.

Apart from the obvious timing (day of the week, time of day) element,I have learned that it really does matter how you phrase your Tweets.

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The wording, and in particular the first two words of a Tweet, has significant impact on how your Twitter audience will interact with your message. For that reason it is very important to test the wording of your Tweets. Because it is difficult to know off the hand what your audience are most likely to react to.

So let me test your ability to guess an effective Tweet. Vote for the Tweet you think generated the best Click Through Rate (CTR) below, then see what others voted, and then read on for the result (no cheating please ,-)

See below if you guessed the correct answer.

The results were as follows
All of these Tweets had the same objective, which was to get a click to go see my Facebook Page. And yes, we are comparing Apples and Apples.

# 1 with 2,67% CTR was “See what we are talking about over on Facebook today”
# 2 with 0,45% CTR was “Is marketing your game? Come join us on the Facebook page for learning & laughs”
# 3 with 0,37% CTR was “Best Facebook post this week (most shared), go see it here”

I should mention that 2,67% Click Through Rate on a Twitter post is quite high.

Using data from my Objective Marketer account I analyzed the result of 38 Tweets from that campaign. Here you can see some of my findings;

1) I reached an average of 17.945 eyeballs
2) The average CTR was 0,81%
3) The lowest CTR was 0,33% (60 clicks)
4) The highest CTR was 2,67% (482 clicks)

But the most valuable learning was this

After analyzing the sentence structure of each and every Tweet, I learned that every single Tweet starting with the word “See” outperformed all others. In fact the lowest CTR of any Tweet beginning with “See” was 1,00%.

If you want to see the Excel sheet with the actual results, contact me via Twitter here

Let me just be sure that you got this – as you may know English is not my native language;

Starting your Tweet with the word “See” seems to be very effective.

So now you may think “Yeah, but perhaps all the other Tweets were really crappy and that’s why “See” outperforms them”.

Well, fair point, but I think not. The other Tweets mostly began with two words such as;

-> Which is… ?
-> Are you …?
->Best Facebook …
->Most disappointing …

Now, I cannot possibly claim that the same will be true for your own Twitter posts. But I do encourage you test it.

Reality is we don’t know what works until we have experimented and tested. And even then we can never be 100% sure. The same is true for your Twitter marketing activities.

If you want to know how you can test sentence structures for your Tweets, contact me here – or start by getting my The Mind-Box Newsletter for more marketing and social media juice.

 

2017-01-05T14:58:20+00:00

About the Author:

Michael Leander is an award winning international speaker, trainer, consultant and board member. He speaks about topics related to marketing automation, email marketing, social media marketing, digital marketing, direct marketing, CRM and loyalty marketing.

A consistently highly rated keynote speaker, marketing workshop trainer and panelist, he has shared his knowledge in more than 40 countries.

Practicing what he preaches, Michael Leander also shares his knowledge and ideas on his blog and in all of the most popular social channels. Michael Leander hails from the Kingdom of Denmark.