malcom gladwell not talking disrepectful

Malcolm Gladwell not talking – see why I have written him off and find him disrespectful

Malcolm Gladwell is the best-selling author of The Tipping Point and other books. He has managed to get a lot of people interested in his doings. People whom want to follow his next moves, his thoughts, his experiences. In fact, I have been rather fond of this work and have frequently quoted him, his books, his concepts when speaking or training.

But that is all over now.

I have hereby officially written Malcolm Gladwell of my list of people who inspire me.

Let me explain why

A few days ago I came across Malcolm Gladwells Twitter account. My trained eye first looked at his last Tweet. Thinking that it was odd that he had written no Tweets for ages, my eye glanced over to check his follower-number while thinking “he probably gave up, not enough followers to make it worth his while”.

But. To my surprise the guy had more than 75.000 followers.

So more than 75.000 Twitterer’s interested in him, but he doesn’t care about them. He just couldn’t be bothered to write a single post on his Twitter account since ages ago. Is he busy writing more books, making him bigger fortunes? Is he too busy speaking for big bucks in all corners of the world? If Mr. Gladwell cared to listen to the people who pays his bills, he should care deeply about his social media presence.

But wait – there’s more.

The fun doesn’t stop. A quick search later I found his blog. And the story repeats itself; last post was published 7 months ago. A story about how he once beat John Carson in a 1500 meter run. Is that what you would expect to find on the blog of Malcolm Gladwell? Or would you expect to find new stories, discussions etc. about some of his many books?

So what’s the problem here?

I have a serious problem with the social media and sharing behavior of Malcolm Gladwell. Like many of us, he is not constrained by any of the following;

- doesn’t know how to write
- doesn’t know what to write about
- cannot find a commercially beneficial reason to share content
- does not have books coming up that could be pre-launched in social media
- doesn’t have money to pay somebody to organize, coordinate or even ghost-write
- doesn’t have an audience who actually cares about what I write about and will help spread my stories

Shame on you Mr. Gladwell.

We are many who do not

- write very well
- cannot even write English without tons of mistakes
- have a huge audience to write for

but we frigging try, and we take our audiences seriously.

Mr. Gladwell, let me suggest you go take some lessons from Drayton Bird. Like you he is an excellent writer. He is not as famous as you, but he takes his audience very, very seriously by providing them with a constant stream of more or less relevant content.

When I learn something new about this topic, I’ll do my best to keep you posted. Get The Mind-Box to stay tuned

Related Posts

wieden + kennedy fail powerpoint presentation
02/26/2013

The Wieden+Kennedy powerpoint presentation everybody is talking about right now

Did you see the Wieden+Kennedy fail power point presentation everybody is talking about? If not, check it out below. They are challenging the whole advertising and marketing industry. And that is a good thing. Check out their power point presentation and see if you agree. There are some interesting statements in there. Interestingly, I have […]

Read story
video sharing on Facebook beats other content types
01/16/2013

Video sharing on Facebook outperforms other content types in 5 out of 6 industries

Video sharing on Facebook outperforms other content types in 5 out of 6 industries according to new report

Read story

3 Responses to Malcolm Gladwell not talking – see why I have written him off and find him disrespectful

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


nine − = 7

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>